Speakers

Terry Jones

Terry Jones

Terry Jones is a Sr. Research Staff Member (Computer Scientist) within the Computer Science and Mathematics Division (CSMD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A professional researcher with over 25 years of experience at national laboratories, Terry received a M.S. degree in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1996 after receiving a B.S. in Physics from Southwestern Oklahoma State University. Terry has pursued his research interests with the support of over a dozen grants and competitive machine allocations to address a wide variety of high performance computing topic areas that span distributed systems, intelligent system software stacks, precise timing services, complex architectures and resiliency. In addition, Terry is a Senior member of the IEEE and is recognized for technical contributions in middleware and advanced runtime systems. His work portfolio includes a US patent in advanced scheduling techniques and a large track record of peer-reviewed publications.

Estela Suarez

Estela Suarez

Wes Brewer

Wes Brewer

Phillip Carn

Phillip Carn

Philip Carns is a Computer Scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA. He is also an adjunct Associate Professor of electrical and computer engineering at Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA, and a Fellow of the Northwestern-Argonne Institute for Science and Engineering. His research interests include characterization, modeling, and development of storage systems for data-intensive scientific computing. Dr. Carns received a Ph.D. degree in computer engineering from Clemson University in 2005.

Mike Jantz

Mike Jantz

Mike Jantz is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. At UT, Mike leads the CORSys research group, which aims to design and build innovative system tools and techniques to achieve faster, safer, and more efficient execution on modern and emerging architectures. His group has conducted and published research on a variety of topics related to computing performance and efficiency, program profiling and analysis, runtime data management, and dynamic compilation. His work is supported by a number of government and industrial institutions, including the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. Department of Energy, and Intel Corporation. In 2020, he received the NSF CAREER award for his proposal on application guided data management for complex memory systems.

Scott Atchley

Scott Atchley

Scott Atchley is a Distinguished R&D Staff Member and Chief Technology Officer with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s National Center for Computational Science. He is the Systems Architecture team lead within the Technology Integration Group. Scott and his team focus on understanding technology trends and application needs to guide future system procurements. Scott has been heavily involved in DOE’s Exascale Computing Initiative and Project. Scott served as the DOE Technical Representative for AMD’s FastForward-2 Node architecture program and for AMD’s PathForward program. Within the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF), Scott served as the Technical Project Officer for Frontier, OLCF’s fifth leadership system. He currently serves as TPO and System Architect for OLCF’s upcoming sixth leadership system.

James Ang

James Ang

James is the Chief Scientist for Computing in the Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where he serves as the lab lead for the DOE Office of Science (DOE/SC), Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Program. PNNL’s ASCR portfolio includes over 20 R&D projects in applied mathematics, computer science, advanced architectures, and computational modeling and simulation. His computing leadership role also intersects with foundational technology challenges associated with microelectronics and semiconductors. James helped organize the panel on co-design for beyond exascale at the DOE/SC workshop on Basic Research Needs for Microelectronics; served on the executive committee for the Semiconductor Research Corporation Decadal Plan; and was appointed by the U.S. Commerce Secretary to serve on the NIST Industrial Advisory Committee to provide input on R&D gaps for the CHIPS and Science Act. James has a BA in Physics from Grinnell College, a BS in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and MS and PhD degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley.

Dave Hart

Dave Hart

James Lujan

In 1984, while working on his Computer Science and Mathematics degree at New Mexico State University, Mr. Lujan supported the first parallel I/O and Fortran libraries on the early Cray systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He then transitioned to operating system development and support for the first version of Unix on Cray systems, and ultimately to cluster integration and project management with the deployment of the first large-scale cluster for use in the NNSA’s Advanced Simulation and Computing program. Currently, he is involved in the project management, acquisition, and technical integration of current and future large-scale supercomputing systems and their associated R&D. He serves as the ASC Program/Project Director for the High Performance Computing division at Los Alamos National Laboratory. His project portfolio includes the Trinity, Crossroads, Venado, and ATS-5 projects.

Nick Wright

Nicholas J. Wright is the chief architect and the advanced technologies group lead at the National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) center. Most recently, he led the effort to optimize the architecture of the Perlmutter machine, the first NERSC platform designed to meet needs of both large scale simulation and data analysis from experimental facilities. His research interests are in performance analysis of HPC applications and architectures and he has published more than 40 papers in these areas. Nicholas has a Ph.D. from the University of Durham in computational Chemistry and has been with NERSC since 2009.

Jim Brandt

James (Jim) Brandt is a Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories. Jim’s research interest for the past two decades has been in holistic data-driven analysis of HPC eco-system resource utilization and state. He leads the development effort for Sandia’s Lightweight Distributed Metric Service (LDMS) which has been in production use for a decade and installed on large-scale systems across the DOE and NSF. Jim also leads SNL’s AppSysFusion project, which enables run time combined application+system monitoring, through the interoperability of LDMS with other tools including Kokkos, Darshan, and Caliper. Jim leads work in the area of application of AI/ML to modeling and optimization of application resource utilization and anomaly detection. Jim has a M.S. degree in Computer Engineering from Santa Clara University and a B.S in Physics from California State University Hayward.